Thanksgiving Stuffing Recipe

From my family table to yours . . . simply delicious stuffing.

Ingredients:
1/2 Loaf Goldilocks Goodies Bread, plus ends.sandwich bread
6 TBS butter
1 onion, diced
4 celery stalks, diced
1 egg
1 bunch fresh parsley
salt, pepper, seasoning

Pre-heat oven 375 degrees.  In a stove top pan, heat 2 TBS butter. Add onion and celery.  Brown for 5 minutes on medium high heat.  Add salt, pepper and desired seasoning (I like Old Bay, cumin and celery salt).

Remove from stove and add to a large mixing bowl of cubed bread.  Stir in one egg and finely chopped fresh parsley.  Cut 2 TBS butter into bowl and stir.

Put in baking tray/pan and top with remaining 2 TBS of butter (Mama says: you can never have too much butter) and cover with foil. Bake 30 mins.  Remove foil and bake an extra 10-15 minutes for a crunchy top, if so desired.

If you’d like a homemade gluten-free pie this year as well, there will be a limited amount  available at Salud, the Healthy Pantry (Falls Church, VA) , Baklava Couture (Kensington, MD) and Lemon Street Market (Lancaster PA) starting Sunday, November 22.

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A “Neat” Discovery

So, it’s 23 days into my gluten-free diet and I was beginning to run out of dinners that were gluten-free and contained the right amount of protein. It’s expensive to have meat at every meal and there’s only so much beans and rice one can have! So I ventured into a new world.

At our local grocery store there was a packet of this meat replacement called “Neat”. Not only is it gluten-free, but also 100% vegetarian and soy free! The greatest part, the company is also based out of Lancaster County!

Last night for dinner was the first time I used the product and it was absolutely fantastic. I used their Italian Mix to make “neatballs” for a pasta dish, which I used corn noodles in place of regular wheat pasta. The meal was very easy, and tasted exactly like meatballs would. I highly recommend this product even if you aren’t a vegetarian!

To find out if Neat is near you go to their website where they also have more recipes and information about their product!

Picnic Fare

Hello everyone! I hope your 4th of July weekend was fantastic!

This was my first gluten-free holiday filled with two picnics and many many leftovers. Now, normally I would eat my fair share of burgers, dogs, and cake, but this holiday was a little different. The first big switch I made was a bunless burger with lettuce as my “bun”. It was great! Super fresh and very filling!

Now, the second biggest task to my weekend besides asking nearly everyone at the picnics what was in their dish, was creating my own dish. Something I’m sure a lot of my friends and Facebook followers know is that I love cooking and baking. So, making up my mind as to what to share with my family and friends is a huge decision. I had planned to make something with fresh local vegetables since a new produce stand just opened up in our town (if you’re in Southern Lancaster County, I highly recommend visiting Meck’s produce stand along Beaver Valley Pike outside of Quarryville). That’s when I came up with the plan to put a twist on a picnic favorite–summer tomato salad.

Your normal summer tomato salad comes with cherry or grape tomatoes, corn, and avocado. So to shake things up, I added a creamy chipotle dressing. The homemade chipotle sauce I got from a friends dad (thanks Erik Junggust!) and I added a base of sour cream so there wouldn’t be too much bite to the dish. Below is instructions on how to recreate this creamy chipotle garden salad:

  1. Cook 2 ears of corn however you like. I baked mine, husks and all, in the oven at 350 for 30 minutes. Cool the corn so it’s easy to touch then de-kernel your corn. Set aside.
  2. Cut about a pint of grape or cherry tomatoes in half. Combine cooked corn and cut tomatoes in a medium size bowl.
  3. Dice two avocados and fold into your corn and tomato mix.
  4. To prepare your creamy chipotle sauce you’ll first need a chipotle dressing base (this one will work just fine). I added 3 tbsps of the dressing to about a 1/2 C of sour cream. You can adjust the amount of kick by increasing or decreasing the amount of chipotle dressing you include. Fold in the mixed sauce to your vegetables.
  5. Serve cold. If not immediately serving place a layer of plastic wrap directly on top of the salad so the avocado isn’t exposed to oxygen which will turn it brown.
  6. Optional: Add four chopped leaves of fresh basil for added flavor!
    Tada!

    Tada!

    Keep checking back for more updates on my first experiences going gluten-free and my first time experimenting with Goldilocks Goodies sandwich bread!

New Guest Writer!

Hello Everyone!

My name is Vanessa Robins, Emily’s cousin, and I’ll be the guest writer for the next month or so! I’m a recent graduate from York College of Pennsylvania with a B.A. in English Literature and I’m new to the gluten-free world.

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I have had digestive issues my entire life and recently decided to try a gluten-free diet for the entire month of July– yes the month of picnics with hotdogs, hamburgers, and cookies. I will be experimenting (and I’m sure failing a little) with recreations of my favorite recipes, new experiences, and of course new ways to use Goldilocks Goodies products! Hopefully you’ll join me in this fun filled and challenging adventure!

 

Behind the Design (Part 1)

So much went into designing and finishing the brand for Goldilocks Goodies I hardly know where to begin.  Soon after I started brainstorming, I realized this needed to be a multi-storied approach, so here is the first.

I knew the most important concept to me was that I come from a very talented line of bakers.  Growing up, I’m pretty sure my mom had something in the oven every day of the week – baked oatmeal, bran muffins, chocolate chip cookies, zucchini bread . . .  The smells would wake us in the morning and greet us when we got home from school.  Everything she made would be gone that day so it was a constant array of treats every week.  (She also canned vegetables, made jelly and pickled beets, rolled pasta and sewed our clothes but I’ll try not to veer off course here).  She learned most of this from her mom, but she’s also been very diligent at collecting recipes from friends, potlucks and even restaurants.  The first bite of something she loved, she would say, “I could make this at home.”

Her mother is a legendary baker – I swear she can make a pie crust in her sleep and she never uses a recipe.  Like most farm girls that married, she was expected to cook for her husband (and his family at times) according to their tastes.  She was shown how by her mother-in-law; Taught in the kitchen, by watching and doing, so there were never recipes written down.  Her grandkids all swoon over her spaghetti sauce, cooked down all day on an iron skillet from her own canned tomatoes.  She would make legendary pies out of the huckleberries our pop-pop would hand pick in the mountains every summer.  The cookies for holidays are momentous  – one entire closet held all the hand made cookies – sand tarts so thin and crispy they were heavenly, raisin-filled cookies, ranger cookies, oatmeal cookies, peanut butter cookies, chocolate dipped peanut butter crackers, turtles, snowballs, and regular ol’ chocolate chip.  The cookie tray would make the rounds of the table to protests, after huge portions of ham, oyster stuffing, venison, sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes, string beans, sweet corn . . . but we couldn’t say no.  Then came the pies, pumpkin pies, minced meat pies, shoo fly pies, pecan pies. Groans! Pie!  No more!  My grandmother would also make her own doughnuts, a great-aunt was known for her bear claws, and my grandfather would make his own potato chips and churn ice cream.  We would call them up after the first good snow to see if they were making ice cream up the road.  Such treats.

Her mother-in-law was the maker of the family-famous old-fashioned caramel icing.  Let me tell you about this icing.  It adorns chocolate cake at special occasions throughout the year.  When I was little it was mostly at family picnics and my grandparents’ annual corn roast (If you haven’t had sweet corn, picked that day from the field, and roasted in burlap bags over a charcoal pit, my friends. …).  My mom and a few aunts continue to make the cake upon request for holidays and I think all of us kids say we request it for our birthdays (and I’m happy to say there are no gluten ingredients in it so I continue to enjoy it on a wonderfully rich, soft, gluten-free chocolate cake).  Ahem.  Back to the story.  I wonder if she learned from her mother, or her mother-in-law and I think about the history and traditions behind the food we eat.

To that end, I didn’t know much about my grandmother’s side of the family.  The farm she lived on during my lifetime was from her husband’s side of the family, with the father (my great-grandfather) and a great uncle running the dairy farm attached.  Combined, they had hundreds of acres, for potatoes, corn, sheep and cows.  This was my backyard.  I could literally walk through the woods to my great uncle’s dairy farm, and from his house down a farm lane to my great-grandfather’s house.  Then through another path to one of my aunt’s house and finally to my grandparents house.

I went out sight-seeing with my grandmother one day for her to show me where she grew up, and where her relatives were from.  The barn in the picture is where her father grew up – it would have belonged to my great-great-grandfather.  It took some trouble finding it since the farm path that used to connect from the main road is no longer there.  We had to explore some smaller paved roads to reach it and it’s now Amish-owned.  I’m glad to see it is still a working farm.  Thank goodness there are places like Lancaster County.

barn sepia

Of course, there’s a lot to be said about using local (and hyper-local) ingredients in baking and cooking.  But the precious time and skill that these farm women had while raising kids and driving a tractor is absolutely awe-inspiring.  After a long day in the kitchen, I think about my grandmother hand rolling a hundred sand tarts and seeing them gone in a day.  Or my mom making thousands of meals for our family from scratch and gone in 30 minutes. It’s truly humbling.  I love the fact that everything I make under Goldilocks Goodies is made by hand, and as the audience grows, I vow to stay committed to the care and skill that my foremothers had every time they wrapped an apron around their waist and rolled up their sleeves.  It’s about taste.  It’s about quality.  It’s about care.

To be continued.. . .